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Theodore Cruz
Theodore Cruz

Impact Of The V! Very Melon! Download Torrent



The Pirate Bay (TPB) is the king of torrent download websites; however, there has been an increase in its server downtime as of late. Its space on the darknet has likewise been disconnected and the site blocked in several parts of the world. On two separate occasions, the site has been found mining for cryptocurrency using the CPU of its guests, a clear no no in the digital world. As TPB falls under possible investigation, users will need to find some alternatives when searching to readily available media. Here are some recommendations for 2018:




Impact of the V! Very Melon! download torrent



Once known as Yify, YTS is a worthy torrent download website with a simple design, user-friendly ads, and quality content. Beware, there are several mirror sites claiming to be the official ones for YTS, so be sure you visit Yts.am.


TorrentDownloads is user-friendly and one of the most commonly visited, high-quality torrent provider website available. You can download torrents related to TV shows, movies, music, games, software, anime, books, and more. The official website of TorrentDownloads can be accessed here at Torrentdownloads.me.


On May 17, 2017, ExtraTorrent suddenly disappeared with a message stating the site had been permanently shut down, but it has since made a comeback with a whole new domain. You can download torrents related to movies, TV shows, anime, books, images, games, software, and apps.


TorrentFunk is a pretty popular torrent downloading platform and home to almost 30 million verified torrents. TorrentFunk lets users search and download torrents on categories like movies, TV shows, games, music, software, anime, and eBooks. The site has better uptime than TPB and can be accessed at Torrentfunk.com.


LimeTorrents is a secure torrent website and a good alternative for those missing TPB. From movies to TV shows to apps to anime, users can search and download the latest in high-quality torrents without any hassle, all by simply searching the site. Thanks to its simple and user-friendly design, LimeTorrents has become a solid alternative torrent site and can be accessed at Limetorrent.cc.


I recommend taking advantage of a money-back guarantee from one of the VPN providers listed above. All of them have Linux apps with guarantees up to 45 days.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/"}},"@type":"Question","name":"How can I connect to a VPN using Linux Network Manager?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"It depends on your VPN provider and the VPN protocol you want to use. Consult your VPN's website documentation. You may be able to download OpenVPN configuration files straight from your provider's website and import them into the Linux Network Manager. Once you have a config file or setup details ready:\n\nClick the network button at the top right of the screen.\nClick on\u00a0VPN off and choose\u00a0VPN settings from the drop down menu.\nClick the\u00a0+\u00a0icon across from\u00a0VPN\nImport your config file or choose the protocol that you want to configure and enter the details.\nClick\u00a0Add\nThe VPN connection will now appear in the configuration window. Click the slider to turn it green and activate the VPN\n","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"How do I set up a L2TP VPN connection in Linux?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"Make sure your VPN provider supports L2TP\/IPSec. If it does, you should be able to get the necessary connection details, which probably include a shared secret on top of your username and password. You may need to install L2TP from the command line. You can then add a connection using the Linux Network Manager using the same steps as above.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"How do I connect to a VPN automatically on Linux?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"Most of the VPNs we recommend have dedicated Linux apps with an option to automatically connect in the settings. Depending on the app, you could set it to connect any time you\u2019re on an unfamiliar or public network, for example.\nIf your VPN is manually configured, getting it to run automatically will depend on your protocol and whether you use a third-party VPN app.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"Is using Linux the best way to download torrents and avoid viruses?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"Most malware is made for Windows, so you have less of a chance of being infected by a virus on Linux. That being said, it\u2019s still well worth it to take precautions on Linux, because there\u2019s plenty of malware out there for you as well.\nThe most important thing is to do your best to only download trustworthy torrents. They should be linked from the official source. Failing that, choose torrents with plenty of good feedback and a lot of seeds.\nA VPN will protect your privacy from any malicious actors on the BitTorrent network and prevent unsolicited requests to your device. Some VPNs, like CyberGhost, include built-in malware protection.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"Will a VPN slow my connection down?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"All VPNs will slow down your internet to some degree, but in most cases the difference is not noticeable. There are two main reasons for the decrease in speed.\nFirst, The VPN app on your device has to encrypt outgoing data and decrypt incoming data, which takes time and resources. The resulting delay is more noticeable on devices with less powerful hardware.\nSecond, your internet data must pass through the VPN server. Both incoming and outgoing data are routed through the VPN server, which is in a different physical location, adding an extra \u201chop\u201d to the connection. Routing through a proxy is not as fast in most cases as a direct connection. You can minimize the resulting delay by choosing a VPN server located near you.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"Does Linux have a built-in VPN?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"No. Although most Linux distros have compatibility with VPN tunneling protocols like L2TP\/IPsec, OpenVPN, and WireGuard, you will still need a VPN subscription. VPN providers allow you to make use of Linux\u2019s VPN support by providing you with remote servers to connect to. The VPNs in this guide also have apps and setup guides for Linux, to allow you to install the VPN and begin using it to gain privacy and added accessibility.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"Which VPN should I use for a Linux system in China?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"If you are in China, you will need a VPN that can bypass the country\u2019s strict firewall. Unfortunately, very few VPNs work in China, and some that do, have had their website blocked. This can make it hard to subscribe from inside of China itself. Luckily, there are a few VPNs that provide functioning obfuscation to allow you to establish a connection and bypass the great firewall of China.\nTo find out more about which VPNs work in China, you can access our guide in the link. If you are looking for a fast answer, we recommend that you opt for NordVPN. We consider Nord the best VPN for Linux and the best VPN for internet users in China because of its wealth of features, fast connections, and excellent obfuscation tech.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"What can my ISP see if I don't use a Linux VPN?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"If you don't use a Linux VPN, your ISP can see everything you do online. This includes your browsing history and the amount of time you spend on each website. Your ISP can also see which device you're using and your approximate location. However, a VPN for Linux routes your data through an encrypted tunnel, preventing your ISP from seeing your online activity.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"Is WireGuard a good option for Linux users?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"Yes. WireGuard is a new, fast, secure, and simple VPN software that uses state-of-the-art cryptography. It's been designed from the ground up to be modern and to take advantage of the latest security features available in Linux.\nWireGuard is still in development, but it's already considered very stable and it has a growing user base. It's an excellent choice for Linux users who are looking for a fast, secure, and simple VPN solution.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"What VPN encryption should I use for Linux?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"There are a number of different VPN encryption protocols you can use with Linux, but AES-256 bit encryption with HMAC SHA256 hash authentication is considered to be the most secure. This combination provides both data confidentiality and message authentication, and it's virtually impossible to crack.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/","@type":"Question","name":"Which VPN is best for Ubuntu?","answerCount":1,"acceptedAnswer":"@type":"Answer","text":"All of the best VPNs for Linux listed in this post work on Ubuntu! So you need only refer to the above list in order to find that NordVPN is the best for Ubuntu. It offers a command-line Linux app with plenty of features including split tunneling and kill switch. Furthermore, NordVPN provides step-by-step instructions on how to install a VPN on Linux. You can use NordVPN on all major Linux distros including the likes of Ubuntu, Debian, and Fedora.","author":"@type":"Person","name":"Paul Bischoff","description":"Paul is Comparitech\u2019s editor and a regular commentator on cyber security and privacy topics in national and international media including New York Times, BBC, Forbes, The Guardian and many others. He's been writing about the tech industry since 2012 for publications like Tech in Asia, Mashable, and various startup blogs. \nPaul has an in-depth knowledge of VPNs, having been an early adopter while looking to access the open internet during this time in China.\nHe previously worked in Beijing as an editor for Tech in Asia, and has been writing and reporting on technology for the last decade. He has also volunteered as a teacher for older adults learning basic tech literacy and cyber awareness. You can find him on Twitter at @pabischoff.\n","url":"https:\/\/www.comparitech.com\/author\/paul-bischoff\/"]} "@context":"http:\/\/s


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